Scandinavian (mashed) potato flat bread – a two-for-one

Sorry for the somewhat weird title, potetkake doesn´t (I discovered) have a really good English translation. Lompe is another Norwegian name for this funny looking, traditional, yet scrumptious whatchamacallit. Since another Norwegian synonym probably doesn´t help you much, I am just gonna call it potetkake for the rest of the post, ok?

And I will do my best to explain to you what it is and I will present one very traditional way to use it, and one untraditional (at least in my region!). Both delicious!

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Roasted leg of lamb (helstekt lammelår)

I promised you lamb for Easter and here it is, just a little bit after Easter! Can I deliver, or what?

Easter and lamb go together like fish and chips, peanut butter and jelly, Sonny and Cher… You get the point. I would claim that Norway has the best lamb in the world. All summer long they graze either up in the mountains or along the coast. This gives the meat a fantastic flavor! So let´s do it justice 🙂

This recipe is a classic Norwegian dish; a slowly roasted leg of lamb served with creamed and gratinated potatoes and vegetables. And a lovely red vintage Rioja – never wrong.

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Fenabog – traditional Norwegian lamb

Last Sunday I peeled potatoes. Ain´t that something? I felt beyond housewifey. But it was the right thing to do for this very traditional Norwegian meal. Actually it is a Christmas dinner, but I wanted to eat it in March. Hence the angel napkins.

Fenabog, and the more common Christmas dish; pinnekjøtt, is cured and salted lamb. The only difference is that they are different parts of the lamb. Pinnekjøtt is lamb ribs, while fenabog is the shoulder of the lamb. Traditionally the meat was cured and salted as preservation methods. Nowadays it is done for the flavor.

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